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Just Purchased Celestron Explorer 102AZ


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Very frustrating! On the bright side, you will obviously have it in the very near future. When you do receive it and go through all the initial construction, set up etc, if you have any issues just ask away.

 

It can be beneficial to initially use it on daytime targets and just get used to  moving it, focussing it and changing eyepieces in the daylight. That way you won’t be using it for the first time in darkness when everything is a bit more awkward especially if your not used to the equipment. I still find myself fumbling eyepieces especially with cold hands!

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On 11/19/2021 at 3:12 PM, Sgt Pepper said:

As per title I am awaiting delivery of this scope. After much research it seem to be the best option for me.

 

Any tips and advice would be very welcome:

 

https://www.celestron.com/products/starsense-explorer-dx-102az

Looks like a decent scope and with the aid of a phone you'll be racking up the targets. 

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2 minutes ago, Marmot said:

Very frustrating! On the bright side, you will obviously have it in the very near future. When you do receive it and go through all the initial construction, set up etc, if you have any issues just ask away.

 

It can be beneficial to initially use it on daytime targets and just get used to  moving it, focussing it and changing eyepieces in the daylight. That way you won’t be using it for the first time in darkness when everything is a bit more awkward especially if your not used to the equipment. I still find myself fumbling eyepieces especially with cold hands!

 Thanks Martin it is mate. The company who I purchased from are none to happy either, they normally use Parcelforce but due to delivery problems late last week went with FedEx, I don't think they will be using them again.

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Oh yeah, you're going to need a flexible dew shield.

 

6URWiTT.jpg

 

Most refractors have inbuilt dew shields but they won't be enough especially in the autumn. My 60EDF has a retractable shield.

 

bsgqyAS.jpg

 

As does my Starwave. They'll still need an additional flexible shield though.

 

nR7YldQ.jpg

 

The shields come in different sizes but they can be adjusted to fit.

 

RDcMTPW.jpg

 

Heaters are also an option but they require a power source.

 

7uJlywP.jpg

 

And a controller, also useful for heating more than one heater strip. I have heated finders.

 

nvqkagZ.jpg

 

Mostly though just a shield will suffice. I always put one on my Mak's. It's just as important with refractors though at this time of the year. A flexible shield extension will hold off dewing for over an hour longer than without. 

 

Vn8YyQN.jpg

Edited by Nightspore
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There are couple of EP's available for £30 each. Are these any good for my scope bearing in mind I would have to choose one or the other?

 

BST Starguider 15mm ED Eyepiece 

or

BST Starguider 18mm ED Eyepiece 

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22 minutes ago, Sgt Pepper said:

There are couple of EP's available for £30 each. Are these any good for my scope bearing in mind I would have to choose one or the other?

 

BST Starguider 15mm ED Eyepiece 

or

BST Starguider 18mm ED Eyepiece 

 

Should be OK. These are very popular and have ED glass elements. The 15mm will give you 44x on your scope, The 18mm will give 36.6x. Personally, I'd wait until you have the scope and have used it a bit before making any decisions about extra EP's.

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3 minutes ago, Nightspore said:

 

Should be OK. These are very popular and have ED glass elements. The 15mm will give you 44x on your scope, The 18mm will give 36.6x. Personally, I'd wait until you have the scope and have used it a bit before making any decisions about extra EP's.

Thanks I will take your advice and wait.🙂

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Hi Baz

 

Nightspore beat me to it: I would also say that you could wait till you get a bit of use from your scope before deciding on extra EPs. The BSTs are really nice EPs and are popular step up from those provided with most scopes. I have several, all of which I purchased used. I paid between £30 and £35 for each. So if you miss the ones you have seen, don’t worry as they regularly come up on the used market.

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I should have mentioned I have the scope and it's rather nice, it took a little time to line the Red Dot Finder with the scope but got there in the end.

I have dowloaded the Celestron App and can't wait to get out and give it a go.......only thing is weather forecast for the near future is pretty horrendous for the NE of England.😢

Edited by Sgt Pepper
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It’s a running joke in the Astro community, that whenever you get new kit it’s a guarantee for cloudy skies. But at least now we all know who to blame for it at the moment🙂

 

there is is a section in the forum titled “show us your Astro gear” where members put pics of recent acquisitions etc. Weather an item is worth £1000, or £10, it’s always of interest.

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You can put the diagonal at any angle you want to make viewing comfortable. Just loosen the little thumb screw that holds it in place, rotate and re fasten. Obviously if you have it too much to one side, or even down, then there is a risk of the EP falling out!

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On 11/25/2021 at 9:42 AM, Sgt Pepper said:

Just a quick newbie question. Can does the mount for the eyepiece have to point straight up or can I view with it angled to one side?

 

It's often easier to rotate the eyepiece to the right if the tripod is set up high. This ensures that you don't accidentally thread the diagonal *nosepiece loose. Usually the slo mo is also easier to get to when seated to the right. Although that just may be me as I'm partially paralysed on my right side.

 

VvWGh7fl.jpg

 

Unless you have a rotating focuser. Most of my refractors have rotating focusers, several are aftermarket.

 

dEpFeoml.jpg

 

With the cat's I usually have them low and sit directly behind. The main difference is that the image will be rotated if the diagonal is rotated.

 

QKqI3CMl.jpg

 

*A big reason I use an Everbrite on my 72ED. It's one piece of cast aluminium so the nose won't unthread.

 

WPhTb7e.jpg

 

 

Edited by Nightspore
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38 minutes ago, Sgt Pepper said:

Is this any good for my scope. It gets excellent reviews?

 

https://www.firstlightoptics.com/finders/telrad-finder-astronomy.html#faq

 

Bear in mind these things are huge. Alright for a 20" Dob maybe. I have a Telrad but I've never used it. I bought it for my 102mm SkyMax. It's longer than the scope! Personally I think they're a bit overrated.

 

Q3e6aTOl.jpg

 

A Rigel OTOH is small, compact, efficient and a marvel of late 70's Bakelite technology.

 

imXRHj0l.jpg

 

The base has to be glued onto the OTA however. So you have to do this right the first time lol.

 

vsmIwWVl.jpg

 

Plus the reticule can pulse with variable speed! Parallax can be a slight issue, but I find they work well.

 

eYNA1Khl.jpg

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Hi Baz

This is an EP that I have no experience of so I can’t make any comment relating to that particular EP, it’s quality or the value (good or bad)at £40.

Baader does seem to have a good reputation though.

 

Here are a couple of my thoughts (correct me if I have got your scope details wrong)

Your scope has a Focal Length of 660mm and an F number of 6.5.

A 10mm EP will therefore give you Magnification of 66x and an exit pupil of a bit over 1.5 (if my maths are correct.) 

I mention the above specs as when buying your first EP upgrades you may want to consider what kind of targets really interest you in order that your money is wisely spent on EPs of a magnification etc that you know you want and you will use.

Its a shame it’s cloudy at the moment (it is here) as the cold crisp air at the moment gives some great views.

 

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More thoughts:🙂

i assume from its name ‘Ortho’ it is orthoscopic in design. Nightspore has reviewed some orthoscopics in the review section and some of his comments may be relevant. From what I remember I believe they have a FOV of approx 50deg and quite short eye relief. These are not necessarily an issue, but some may prefer a wider FOV and others longer eye relief. Unfortunately the only way to know what suits you is through trial and error. 

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1 hour ago, Sgt Pepper said:

I know you guys told me to wait, but just seen this for £40, would you still say hang on a bit. Many thanks in advance:

Baader 10mm Classic Ortho Eyepiece 1.25mm 

 

As far as I know there are only two companies that manufacture traditional Abbe orthoscopics. Both are Japanese. 

 

K12mhXx.jpg

 

Ohi ortho's are sold under a variety of brand names including Astro Hutech and Kokusai. 

 

pVhtbrB.jpg

 

Below: rare volcano top 9mm Circle T (Tani) orthoscopic made with Ohi optics.

 

wHJyakc.jpg

 

The other is Takahashi. Takahashi ortho's actually have a 44 degree AFOV although it's impossible to have greater than 42 degrees with a traditional Abbe. I suspect the extra 2 degrees, achieved with a slightly bigger field stop, are a marketing gimmick and to aid target acquisition. It does improve overall viewing ergonomics. Tak' ortho's have superior contrast to the Ohi, although they do have slightly less transmission IMO. They are probably the best ortho's money can buy. Orthoscopics as a whole are unrivalled in contrast and overall acuity. Although they have a smaller overall field compared to Plossls, they have slightly longer eye relief. I use orthoscopics a lot for lunar and planetary observing. Their simplicity and transmission coupled with outstanding contrast makes them basically unbeatable. 

 

a51A5en.jpg

 

The Baader 'Classic Orthoscopics' are their take on an old Zeiss design. They still have a 42 degree AFOV but that's been increased to around 50 degrees by using a larger field stop. This extra field is just to aid target acquisition and will display some lateral astigmatism outside of 42 degrees. The 32mm BCO is actually a Plossl. The 10mm BCO is an excellent eyepiece. Orthoscopics are a bit specialist and an old design. In recent years they have been making a bit of a comeback. In my opinion they can't be beaten for high planetary magnifications. They're £59 new.

 

VKiQch9.jpg

 

Baader Classic Orthoscopics PDF

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