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Would this be any good for astrophotography?


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Looking at this nikon camera, which says it's had ir full spectrum mod. 

Would this be any good for astrophotography? Read that ir/uv light makes stars look bloated... Would the clip in filters combat this? 

Complete novice so any advice appreciated 

Thanks 

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14 hours ago, Gerrypfc said:

Looking at this nikon camera, which says it's had ir full spectrum mod. 

Would this be any good for astrophotography? Read that ir/uv light makes stars look bloated... Would the clip in filters combat this? 

Complete novice so any advice appreciated 

Thanks 

Screenshot_20220131-171441_Facebook.jpg

It can make the stars bloat but from what I have seen they mostly come out fine, I chose not to modify my camera as even with filters most cameras struggle to get the white balance correct (owned a 60Da) and yes you can edit it out but with say a few hundred shots during the daytime it will be very tedious. Back to your point of will the above be suitable, the answer is most certainly if at the right price.

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Ah ok, this is a picture she put on the post, which she said was taken with the camera.. But obviously you've had experience with using a similar spec camera. 

 

Admittedly my telescope probably isn't the best option for astrophotography. 

Currently got a skywatcher explorer 130p az but have just won a nexstar 6se on a competition 😁. (again, not ideal, but it'll do. I plan on either buying a Celestron wedge for it... Or just making my own). Read on another forum, another guy was managing 5 minute exposures with this. Which is probably the maximum I'd want to go for atm anyway 

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47 minutes ago, Gerrypfc said:

Ah ok, this is a picture she put on the post, which she said was taken with the camera.. But obviously you've had experience with using a similar spec camera. 

 

Admittedly my telescope probably isn't the best option for astrophotography. 

Currently got a skywatcher explorer 130p az but have just won a nexstar 6se on a competition 😁. (again, not ideal, but it'll do. I plan on either buying a Celestron wedge for it... Or just making my own). Read on another forum, another guy was managing 5 minute exposures with this. Which is probably the maximum I'd want to go for atm anyway 

Screenshot_20220201-113723_Facebook.jpg

You will notice that the grass is rather a dark green and the white feathers have a pink tinge, that is what daytime shots will look like and every colour looks brighter as well as strange colour shifts.

 

Actually, here are some shots I did with the 60Da and a UV/IR filter. The wolf was much whiter and more brown than it looks from this shot, the peacock was the same, all were processed to remove the red /pink tinge, but it cannot be totally removed. I mean, try it with filters and see as for the price they want for a modified cam is a steal.

Artic Wolf.jpg

Female Peacock (2).jpg

Sumatran Tiger.jpg

Edited by Cumbrianwolf
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My camera is a Nikon D3500, but it’s unmodified. I use it primary for astrophotography, with the 70-300mm zoom lens that came with it. Even unmodified, it takes really nice images of DSOs. I’m still fairly new at all this, but from what I’ve learned, the one you’re looking at should be great for astrophotography. You’ll get better nebulosity color with less integrated exposure time. I can’t speak to the bloating stars issue though, I had no idea that was even a thing. 

Edited by Josie
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15 hours ago, Josie said:

 I can’t speak to the bloating stars issue though, I had no idea that was even a thing. 

If you remove all IR/UV filters from the system you may get star bloat because unwanted invisible light also hits the sensor but its defocused. This is a problem normally associated with refractors but can affect any system using some glass to focus (even expensive triplets). Check out "minus violet" filters. (Mirror-only OTAs focus all light at the same point but if you use one with a coma corrector you may get bitten!).

 

As Roger says, suck it and see. Half the fun is experimenting 🙂

Edited by paul
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3 hours ago, paul said:

If you remove all IR/UV filters from the system you may get star bloat because unwanted invisible light also hits the sensor but its defocused. This is a problem normally associated with refractors but can affect any system using some glass to focus (even expensive triplets). Check out "minus violet" filters. (Mirror-only OTAs focus all light at the same point but if you use one with a coma corrector you may get bitten!).

 

As Roger says, suck it and see. Half the fun is experimenting 🙂

I have witnessed the issue of star bloat via the refractor guide scope I use, the guide camera is unfiltered and PHD2 shows a star and the unfocussed image behind this akin to a diffused halo, does not affect anything but thought I would mention that it can happen. 

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