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Heart & Soul - Quick grab through the clouds


mightymonoped
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Managed to find an hour free from high cloud enough to grab nearly an hour on this with the Samyang 135mm f2 last night. An hour with this lens is worth 2 under decent skies I suppose. 

 

Not happy about the stars in upper-left qusdrant. Tilt maybe? Have never noticed it before at f2.8 with this lens. 

 

ASI294mc pro -10C unity gain

ASIair Pro - guiding like a dream!

Optolong l-enhance filtee

 

Tony

 

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Nice seeing the zoomed out view (so to speak) that the Samyang produces. I think you are right about tilt in the left corner. Have a check to see if there is an obstruction between the face of the camera and the rear mounting on the lens. 

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Hi Tony, just back from a week in North Yorkshire where the skies, when clear, were very good. Jupiter and Mars were amazingly bright and the obvious asterisms were somewhat dimmed by the brightness of other stars in the Milky Way. All brilliant to see.

Anyway the real reason behind my message is to say how good it was to see the ASIair images at the top of your page. 

They would reassure anyone new to astro-photography that the amazing pictures you often post are as a result of a combination of lots of exposure time and knowledge of image processing. Moreover, much closer to what you would actually see through a telescope by simply looking through it. Of course the heart and soul can't be seen simply by looking but even a DSLR with a reasonable lens, given the right conditions, can capture a hint of the nebulosity waiting to be revealed with a little more experience.       Gary

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2 hours ago, Sonyme said:

They would reassure anyone new to astro-photography that the amazing pictures you often post are as a result of a combination of lots of exposure time and knowledge of image processing

 

As someone new to astro-everything - I concur!  Very inspirational!

 

One question, what do you mean by "tilt" in this context?  I didn't see anything out of the ordinary with any picture in this thread, though I don't know what to look for in most cases.  

 

Very nice work!!

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5 hours ago, Sonyme said:

Hi Tony, just back from a week in North Yorkshire where the skies, when clear, were very good. Jupiter and Mars were amazingly bright and the obvious asterisms were somewhat dimmed by the brightness of other stars in the Milky Way. All brilliant to see.

Anyway the real reason behind my message is to say how good it was to see the ASIair images at the top of your page. 

They would reassure anyone new to astro-photography that the amazing pictures you often post are as a result of a combination of lots of exposure time and knowledge of image processing. Moreover, much closer to what you would actually see through a telescope by simply looking through it. Of course the heart and soul can't be seen simply by looking but even a DSLR with a reasonable lens, given the right conditions, can capture a hint of the nebulosity waiting to be revealed with a little more experience.       Gary

Cheers Gary, I wont ruin my new altruistic image by confessing I was just showing off my good guiding figures then. 😂👍

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3 hours ago, Adam Y said:

 

As someone new to astro-everything - I concur!  Very inspirational!

 

One question, what do you mean by "tilt" in this context?  I didn't see anything out of the ordinary with any picture in this thread, though I don't know what to look for in most cases.  

 

Very nice work!!

Thanks Adam!

if you look at the stars in the corners of the image you’ll see that on one side, and one quadrant in particular, the stars are bloated and somewhat misshapen.
 

In the HOO image, it’s top left. In the SHO image it’s upside-down, do bottom right. 
 

This is indicative of the image sensor not being being absolutely square on with the optical train for some reason. 
 

Could be one of any number of reasons but I suspect it’s my fiddling around with the mounting of the Samyang in the scope ring when I was rotating the camera to frame the image. 
 

Tony

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